The Questions You Ask Determine Your Results

Questions Determine ResultsI occasionally visit forums and Facebook groups that interest me.

I like to read the questions asked. Sometimes I’ll add my opinion and help out. Sometimes I drop a smart-ass comment (they’re often the same).

What amazes me is how many people ask terrible questions.

You would think I would stop being surprised with the ignorance running rampant on the internet. But I’m not.

I try to set my expectations lower. I really do.

Now, it’s not like they’re speaking a foreign language and trying to ask a questions in poorly translated English. The questions are truly bad.

Your high school teacher probably told you there’s no such thing as a stupid question. He was stupid for saying that.

There are many, many stupid questions.

Here are the types of questions I’m talking about:

  • What’s the best (fill in the blank)?

This question people ask and give zero details for anyone to help.

Well, I’m using item X and I think it’s the best. But you may think it’s crap.

We don’t know your experience nor do we know the solution you’re chasing. If you would’ve provided more detail, a lot more detail, about how you’re going to use the product/service/etc then we could start to help.

With that question, all you’re going to get are biased answers from people who will tell you what they think is best.

And all they’re doing is validating their reason for purchasing. It makes them feel good. But may not be the best reasons for you.

If I asked you what the best movie was, what would you say?

Guess what?

I hate that movie. It’s crap. So there.

Remember that answer if you ever want to ask, “What’s the best…?”

Here’s another stink bomb.

  • Does anyone use XYZ product?

The first thought in my head, “Yes. Someone does. Why are you wasting everyone’s time?”

Again, the question has no context.

It’s a brain fart.

And the answers that flow aren’t any help to anyone.

“Yes, I do and I love it.” Or, “I used to but I found ABC better.”

And it devolves from there.

Here’s one that walks the fine line between garbage and gold.

  • How do I do X?

Sometimes these are good, specific questions.

However, the majority suck wind.

I instantly want to place this link in the reply.

My thoughts flow like this, “Let’s see something here… You have the capability to type the question in this group. Hmm. How come you can’t type the question as a Google search? Hmmm?”

Oh, you want me to search Google for you?

When the bible talks about sloth it says, “A person who is too lazy to search Google for himself.”

Ha. That was fun.

At least it made me chuckle.

When you ask better questions you get better answers.

That’s a given.

But it isn’t practiced often.

I was talking with a software developer and he said, “Unfortunately, I can’t give customers an IQ test before they buy.”

He is so frustrated from these types of questions. They’re the type of support questions he has to deal with on a regular basis.

We live in this instant world. Whenever we have a flash of thought we post it somewhere.

The problem arises when we think people know what we’re asking.

Nobody can read your mind.

And it’s the same when you’re selling.

When you ask your client effective questions you’re likely to make the sale.

What about the questions you ask yourself before building your sales funnel and marketing?

Or do you only squeak out those stinky brain farts?

That stench lingers.

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